“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science.” – Albert Einstein

Normally we prefer to stay in the park, but for our visit to Mammoth Cave National Park we opted to try a highly rated B&B located just minutes outside the park. We could not have been more pleased with our stay at Serenity Hills Bed and Breakfast as the hosts, Rick and Steph, are wonderful and the breakfast is outstanding.

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Mammoth is aptly named. With over 400 miles of surveyed passages, Mammoth Cave is by far the world’s longest known cave system. Judging by the crowds and tickets selling out quickly, we would guess that Ranger led cave tours are the most popular activity at Mammoth Cave. Get tickets online as soon as you know your dates to visit. Even planning ahead, we were unable to secure slots on one of the coveted Intro to Caving and Wild Cave tours. We guessed from the mock-up at the visitor center that it might look like this!

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First we did the Domes and Dripstones Tour which is exactly as the name describes. Recent snowmelt and rainfall made the cave particularly wet and we had fun ducking, shimmying, and side stepping through some pretty narrow rock.

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No flash allowed in the caves.

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The caves are very tight and if you don’t pay attention you are sure to gain a headache!

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Normally folks go on the Historic Tour first, but we did it after the Domes and Dripstones Tour because why not. We entered the cave by way of the “Natural Entrance” and we learned a lot of interesting history. The tour is not for the faint of heart and requires some stamina to complete the two miles. Unlike our visit to Carlsbad Caverns where we felt like a visitor in a spacious cave, a tour into Mammoth Cave requires ducking, sliding and squirreling your way around in longer narrower chambers.

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The Natural Entrance

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Visited March, 2015

Up next: Hot Springs National Park